Your Questions About Renewable Energy Content

Helen asks…

Is the carbon tax really for preventing climate change?

So here’s what currently baffles me; if climate change is being used as an excuse to implant a new taxation on carbon, why oh why did the Bush administration try to deny its existence for so long?

Surely big oil, which has substantial influence in world governance, would be afraid of carbon taxing, and indeed the ensuing encouragement of renewable energy, over which they would have much less control (read; money). Or will they simply make sure to take over the emerging “renewables” sector too?

admin answers:

No it is not for preventing climate change. 1. We cannot prevent climate change. 2. It is to punish industrial nations and to lower the standard of living around the globe.

Here is a good article that discusses the science behind point 1.

Http://www.nationscrier.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=63%3Aclimate-change-natural-or-man-made&Itemid=62

John asks…

Do business leaders in renewable energy lack vision?

I the panel session at a conference yesterday I asked the chairman of a new bio-diesel plant how he saw the industry developing over the next 30-40 years to take the market share of renewable transport fuels from insignificant to 95%+ to replace fossil fuels when they run out. The response showed no interest at all in expanding beyond a small regional market. Is this a common attribute, or are there visionary business leaders that are thinking big picture and have plans to replace fossil fuels?

admin answers:

30-40 years is to far ahead.
Peak oil will come within this decade.
When that happens, the energy industry will be turned on it’s head.
It’s not impossible that in 20 years, hydrogen fusion will become available.
That would completely upset the apple cart.
In a good way, mind you.

Any alternative source today needs to focus on making a profit in order to not go under.
Once they’ve reached that, then they can look farther ahead.

Also, i’m just not sure about bio-fuel.
I have seen estimates that would indicate that it would be possible to be a significant part of our energy.
But it just doesn’t seem to me that we’d be able to get that energy content from plants, in a reasonable acreage, and still produce the food that we’ll need.

Jet planes will likely need something like that.
Long haul trucks would as well.
Maybe trains in sparsely populated areas of the country.
But i’m not sure about most other transportation.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *